Passport Week in Apopka Ends Tomorrow

first_img Thanks for asking. We got the cost info from the Clerk and added it to the story. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply TAGSPassport Office Previous articleApopka is Bear CountryNext articlePassover is a time for Christians and Jews to reconnect Dale Fenwick RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Please enter your name here The Anatomy of Fear Dale Fenwick You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here Support conservation and fish with NEW Florida specialty license plate April 14, 2016 at 6:39 pm Reply Reply Herman Engleman April 14, 2016 at 2:14 pm Reply Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.center_img Linda Lovett Reported them lost? Did you get a response of the lost? Normally they will mail you a letter what to do. Normally there is replacement fee now if it five years later you may have to apply for a renewal Free webinar for job seekers on best interview answers, hosted by Goodwill June 11 4 COMMENTS Please enter your comment! The Clerk’s Apopka branch will be open tomorrow (Saturday),  from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM.Vacation season is right around the corner and to help you get ready, the Clerk’s Office is hosting a Passport Week to make the application process more convenient.Anyone planning a trip abroad this summer will need a passport.  Next week only you can avoid the hassle of mailing in your application by stopping by the Orange County Service Center on Rock Springs Road.From April 18th to 23rd you may be able to apply for a passport at the Orange County Clerk’s Office without having to take additional time off of work or school.Throughout the week, the Passport Division in the Orange County Courthouse will stay open an extra hour and a half until 5:30 pm to allow customers to apply for a passport after hours. In addition, passport services will be available in Apopka on Saturday, April 23rd from 10:00 am to 2:00 pm.For Passport Week, the hours of operation for the Clerk’s Apopka branch will be Monday thru Friday 8:30 AM to 4:00 PM.  The Apopka office will open on Saturday, April 23rd from 10:00 AM to 2:00 PM to allow customers to apply for a passport without having to take time off of work or school.Meanwhile, the Passport Division in the Courthouse downtown will extend their normal business hours an extra hour and a half Monday thru Friday, but will not open on Saturday.Customers can apply for a passport at any time, not just during Passport Week, at the following Clerk’s offices during normal business hours.• Orange County Courthouse: 425 North Orange Avenue, Room 355• Apopka Branch: 1111 North Rock Springs Road• Ocoee Branch: 475 West Story Road• Winter Park Branch: 450 North Lakemont Avenue• Goldenrod Branch: 684 S. Goldenrod Road, Pinar PlazaThe Clerk charges a $25 Application Processing Fee.Those applying for a passport for the very first time must apply in person. Children under the age of 16 must apply in person with both of their parents present. If one parent cannot make it, that parent must submit a notarized Statement of Consent and a copy of the front and back of their driver’s license.There is no need for customers to go elsewhere to have their passport photograph taken. Passport photographs can be taken while applying for their passport. The passport photo fee is $10.00.Passport renewals is not a service offered by the Clerk’s office.Use this link to access the Orange County Clerk’s Passport Page. My husband and I lost our passports on an airport 5 years ago We reported them lost but they were never found. How do we replace them? We do not have any pertinent numbers although we are at the same address. October 8, 2017 at 10:20 am Reply How much does it cost? D Bird April 14, 2016 at 6:19 am Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitterlast_img read more

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IoF’s Peter Lewis issues response to Lord Grade’s recent Telegraph comments

first_imgHowever: one person seemed quite pleased:https://twitter.com/RobWilson_RDG/status/881990053261701120 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis13  62 total views,  2 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis13 IoF’s Peter Lewis issues response to Lord Grade’s recent Telegraph comments CEO of the Institute of Fundraising Peter Lewis has said he is “frustrated and saddened” by Lord Grade’s comments made in The Daily Telegraph ahead of Thursday’s (6th July) launch of the Fundraising Preference Service.In a piece in The Daily Telegraph yesterday (4th July) which highlighted £25,000 fines for charities that ‘pester donors for cash’, Lord Grade, chairman of the Fundraising Regulator, said that the new system was required because “Too many charities are proving to be laggards’, and failing to change their fundraising practices.In fact, the Fundraising Regulator itself will not issue fines, with only the Information Commissioner’s Office having the powers to do so.In a statement given in response to Lord Grade’s comments, IoF chief executive Peter Lewis said:“Fundraisers are passionate people who work tirelessly to make a difference every day. Charities are there on the frontline when crises strike, providing the safety net when society needs it the most. But they can only do that with the generosity and support of the millions of people who give their time and money to help others.“That’s why I am deeply frustrated and saddened to again hear Lord Grade talking this morning about the fundraising community in a negative way, misrepresenting how the overwhelming majority of charities communicate with and value their supporters. We know that our members’ relationships with donors is paramount, which is why over the last year charities have supported the set-up of the Regulator and helped to shape the FPS.“We fully support a strong regulatory system. However, for any non-statutory system to succeed, it is vital that clarity prevails over confusion. Only then can the regulator fully command the trust of both charities and the public. Ahead of Thursday’s launch of the FPS it is essential that the public hear the right information about the service so that the levels of public trust and confidence that Lord Grade wants to see can be achieved.”Lord Grade was also criticised by others in the fundraising community with many taking to Twitter to voice their views:https://twitter.com/waterglass60/status/882223657107550211 Advertisement Tagged with: Fundraising Preference Service Fundraising Regulator Institute of Fundraising  61 total views,  1 views today Melanie May | 5 July 2017 | News About Melanie May Melanie May is a journalist and copywriter specialising in writing both for and about the charity and marketing services sectors since 2001. She can be reached via www.thepurplepim.com.last_img read more

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Rosebud Sioux say House Vote for Keystone XL is ‘act of war’

first_imgWorkers World reprints this Nov. 14 article by Wica Agli, of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe, published by the Earth First! Newswire. Since then the Keystone XL pipeline was narrowly turned down in the Senate on Nov. 18, but is expected to pass in January with the new Congress.Rosebud Sioux rally at Sept. 21 Climate Change march in NYC.Rosebud, S.D. — In response to today’s vote in the U.S. House of Representatives to authorize the Keystone XL tar sands pipeline, the Rosebud Sioux Tribal president announced that the Rosebud Sioux Tribe (Sicangu Lakota Oyate) recognizes the authorization of this pipeline as an act of war.The tribe has done its part to remain peaceful in its dealing with the United States in this matter, in spite of the fact that the Rosebud Sioux Tribe has yet to be properly consulted on the project, which would cross through tribal land, and the concerns brought to the Department of Interior and to the Department of State have yet to be addressed.“The House has now signed our death warrants and the death warrants of our children and grandchildren. The Rosebud Sioux Tribe will not allow this pipeline through our lands,” said President [Cyril] Scott of the Rosebud Sioux Tribe. “We are outraged at the lack of intergovernmental cooperation. We are a sovereign nation and we are not being treated as such. We will close our reservation borders to Keystone XL. Authorizing Keystone XL is an act of war against our people.”In February of this year, the Rosebud Sioux Tribe and other members of the Great Sioux Nation adopted tribal resolutions opposing the Keystone XL project.“The Lakota people have always been stewards of this land,” added President Scott. “We feel it is imperative that we provide safe and responsible alternative energy resources not only to tribal members but to non-tribal members as well. We need to stop focusing and investing in risky fossil fuel projects like TransCanada’s Keystone XL pipeline. We need to start remembering that the earth is our mother and stop polluting her and start taking steps to preserve the land, water, and our grandchildren’s future.”The Rosebud Sioux Tribe, along with several other South Dakota Tribes, stand together in opposition to risky and dangerous fossil fuel projects like TransCanada’s Keystone XL. The proposed route of TransCanada’s Keystone XL pipeline crosses directly through Great Sioux Nation (Oceti Sakowin) Treaty lands as defined by both the 1851 and 1868 Fort Laramie Treaties and within the current exterior boundaries of the Rosebud Sioux Reservation and Cheyenne River Sioux Reservation.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Journalist forced into exile and his paper censors itself in a disturbing start to year for mexican press

first_img Help by sharing this information Receive email alerts MexicoAmericas 2011-2020: A study of journalist murders in Latin America confirms the importance of strengthening protection policies Reports Reporters Without Borders urgently appealed to federal authorities to react after three cases demonstrated the threats to which the Mexican press is exposed. The organisation voiced particular concern after Carlos Huerta Muñoz, of the daily Norte de Ciudad Juárez, was forced into exile by death threats believed to come from drug-traffickers, on 30 January. NSO Group hasn’t kept its promises on human rights, RSF and other NGOs say MexicoAmericas to go further Organisation Follow the news on Mexico News May 5, 2021 Find out more RSF_en May 13, 2021 Find out more Reporters Without Borders today expressed its concern after Carlos Huerta Muñoz, crime correspondent on the daily Norte de Ciudad Juárez, in Chihuahua state, northern Mexico, was forced to flee the country, after getting death threats from a drug cartel.His newspaper’s management decided the day after his departure on 30 January to drastically reduce its coverage of drug-trafficking and to stick to official information on the subject. Two other recent cases have underlined a still alarming situation for the Mexican press. Octavio Soto Torres, editor of the daily Voces de Veracruz, survived a shooting attack in Pánuco, Veracruz in the east of the country on 23 January and the home of Cecilia Vargas Simón, of the daily La Verdad del Sureste, had his home broken into and searched in Villahermosa, Tabasco, in south-east Mexico on 27 January.“One journalist forced into exile, another victim of a murder attempt and then a break-in at a journalist’s home. All methods are good to silence a journalist when he doesn’t pay with his life for his work,” the worldwide press freedom organisation said.“The start of this year does not bode well for the Mexican press, which is one of the continent’s most exposed to reprisals from organised crime. Now Carlos Huerta Muñoz has fled abroad, will Mexican journalists who are threatened end up imitating their Colombian colleagues, who had been forced to flee their country or their region?” the organisation asked.“We urge the federal authorities, starting with the Office for the Investigation of Crimes Against Journalists (FEADP) to take over the investigations into these three cases.”Huerta Muñoz, a crime and drug-trafficking specialist on the Norte de Ciudad Juárez, in Juarez city, received telephoned death threats on 30 January from an anonymous caller who said he was from “The Federation”, a drug cartel grouping. The call apparently came from a mobile phone in Sonora state in the north-west. Similar threats were made to local media like the daily Diario de Juárez and Canal 44 television. Despite being offered police protection, Huerta Muñoz decided to leave Mexico with his family, according to the Centre for Journalism and Public Ethics (CEPET), a Mexican press freedom organisation. The editor of the Norte de Ciudad Juárez, Alfredo Quijano, told Reporters Without Borders that the journalist had refused police protection. “Since the police have been infiltrated (by organised crime), we don’t believe that the federal, state or municipal authorities can provide us with guarantees that we can do our jobs,” he said.Quijano also justified the newspaper’s decision to resort to self-censorship, saying, “If we continue to publish investigations into organised crime we will put our staff in danger.” Two regional dailies have already adopted this policy: El Imparcial in Hermosillo, Sonora, after the disappearance of journalist Alfredo Jiménez Mota, on 2 April 2005, and El Mañana in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas, in the north-east, whose offices were peppered with machine-gun fire on 6 February 2006. Elsewhere, the editor of the daily Voces de Veracruz, Octavio Soto Torres, was slightly injured in an armed attack as he went, with his 16-year-old son to the scene of a road accident on 23 January. Three armed men chased them in a car and opened fire, grazing the journalist’s head. Soto Torres told Reporters Without Borders that the attack could be linked to his criticism of sugar cane producers and his tense relations with some municipal officials. The journalist has suffered seven similar attacks over the past ten years.Finally, Cecilia Vargas Simón, of the daily Verdad del Sureste, received death threats on his mobile phone on 27 January telling him. “You have received the message we left at your home. Stop writing. Don’t try to find us.” A few hours before the call was made the journalist’s home in Villahermosa was broken into a searched but nothing was taken. Vargas Simón has been threatened before in connection with his articles. News News February 5, 2008 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Journalist forced into exile and his paper censors itself in a disturbing start to year for mexican press Reporter murdered in northwestern Mexico’s Sonora state April 28, 2021 Find out morelast_img read more

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Dinny McGinley announces working group to focus on attracting new jobs to west Donegal

first_imgNews Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Twitter 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Facebook Pinterest Pinterest Google+ A working group is being established with the goal of attracting new, sustainable jobs in west Donegal.The news was confirmed by Gaetacht Minister Dinny McGinley in the wake of the decision by Largo Foods to close its Gweedore factory with the loss of 142 jobs.The company is centralising its operations at its factory in Co Meath – 70 jobs at that facility are being offered to Donegal workers prepared to relocate.Deputy Dinny McGinley says he is of the opinion that the Largo Foods jobs can’t be saved – he added that the working group will be up and running withing two weeks:[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/dinr530LARGO.mp3[/podcast] Twitter Facebook WhatsAppcenter_img Previous articleAudio: Largo Foods Chief Executive explains decision to close Gweedore factoryNext articleUpdate: Gardai appeal for witnesses to fatal Buncrana collision in which teenager died News Highland Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR By News Highland – March 14, 2014 Dinny McGinley announces working group to focus on attracting new jobs to west Donegal Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry WhatsApp Google+ 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic last_img read more

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Florida sets new record of COVID-19 cases with over 4,000 more

first_imgjganser/iStockBy ELLA TORRES, ABC NEWS(TALLAHASSEE, Fla.) — Florida continued to set record-breaking numbers of COVID-19 cases, with an additional 4,049 new cases reported Saturday.There were an additional 40 Florida resident deaths related to COVID-19, according to the state’s Department of Health.There are now a total of 93,797 Florida cases with 3,144 deaths related to COVID-19, the Department of Health reported.On Friday, Florida reported what was then its record-high one-day increase of 3,822 cases.The day before, the state set its previous daily-increase record of coronavirus cases with 3,207.Florida is one of 17 states that saw an increase in hospitalizations and one of the other 17 states that saw an increase in a rate of positivity, a measure of how many tests are positive for COVID-19 compared to the amount of tests run.Copyright © 2020, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Mesospheric mean winds and tides observed by the Imaging Doppler Interferometer (IDI) at Halley, Antarctica

first_imgThis paper describes the first ever mesospheric wind observations from Halley, Antarctica, over a full year. The recent implementation of an Imaging Doppler Interferometer at Halley is providing a new, high quality and continuous dataset to investigate the dynamics of the Antarctic mesosphere. The mean winds show clear seasonal variations, with reversals in both zonal and meridional components near the equinoxes. The dominant tidal modes have periods of 12 h and 24 h but with significant variations in amplitude during the year. Waves with longer periods are also apparent at certain times of year. The seasonal variations and amplitudes of the winds and tides are compared with other high-latitude sites in the southern and northern hemispheres. It is found that the overall pattern of winds at Halley is broadly similar to that seen at similar geographic latitudes, but with noticeable differences which may be related to it being a southern hemisphere site.last_img read more

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‘Destiny: Local To Global Perspectives’ JCTC Art Show Explores Meanings &…

first_imgDestiny: Local To Global Perspectives opens Friday, Feb.7, at Merseles Studios, 339 Newark Avenue, Jersey City.The series includes an Art Talk (Feb. 17), where several Destiny artists will discuss their approach to the topic and how their work speaks to its theme, and a Closing Reception (Feb. 28).The Destiny: Local To Global Perspectives even runs 6 – 10 p.m. and includes artist reception.“Meaningful art inspires us to ask questions and to have conversations around those questions,” said Olga Levina, Artistic Director, JCTC. “Each and every one of us, at some point in our lives asks, what is my destiny? If everyone’s destiny is already predetermined, should we even try to make a difference? Once you start asking that question on the individual level, you eventually have to ask the same questions of our community, our country and our culture. ”The work was selected through an open call process – artists submitted pieces in response to the very human paradox of never being certain exactly what we can control in our lives and what in our lives are beyond our control.The Art Call challenged artists to respond to such prompts as “Are we bound for destiny or does destiny happen to us? Is it coincidence or synchronicity? Do we determine our fate or are we victims of it? What does our society of diverse & complex human beings believe or avoid believing? What are the cultural norms and do they conform to or rebel against those norms?”Destiny: Local To Global Perspectives is curated by Atim Annette Oton, a Nigerian-born, American and British educated designer turned curator.In addition to curating JCTC’s Destiny: Local To Global Perspectives, the Stories of Greenville Art Walk and other JCTC events, this Jersey City resident is the director of Calabar Gallery in Harlem and founder of the Creative Side, an arts and design consultancy.“The work in this show deals with destiny as an unknown territory that uses the knowledge of one’s past but is also a journey of discovery and letting go,” said Oton. “The artists all come from different cultural backgrounds and use a variety of different mediums. Yet, all the work shares a commonality of theme and is personal, reflective and contemplative. No matter who the artist is or what medium they use, they look at Destiny from everyday life to an imagined or dream world. What I love the most about this exhibition is that truly explores the unknown, but is filled with hope and possibilities.”Artists featured in Destiny: Local To Global Perspectives: Geraldine Anderson Gaines – Rites of Passage (Mixed Media);  Ian “Billy Bones” Murphy – Divination/Oracle Cards (Mixed Media on Paper); Nanette Reynolds Beachner – The Journey to Destiny (Mixed Media, found paper & acrylics); Grigory Gurevich – Universal Concept (Pen & Ink on Paper); Catalina Aranguren – conocimiento de sí mismo (Photography); Janhavi Firke – Tarpa Dance Warli Painting (Wood & Fire) Erin Kuhn – Duality (Mixed Media); Lawrence Ciarallo – Our Dreams (chasing invisible butterflies with nets) (Mixed Media) Monika Karla – Faculties of Energy (Oil on Canvas) Tyber Qalipu Mishipeshu Murphy – Ta’pu (Mixed Media Book); Donchellee Fulwood – The Light Approach (Acrylic on Canvas); Duda Penteado – Immigration-Emigration (Mixed Media on canvas); Anna Kasperowitz – The Liberation of Eve (Acrylic and Gold Leaf on Wood Panel); David James – Saint Jamaal, In the Distance, (_Blank_) Expectation (Digital Art); Cecilia Martinez – The Self Portraits: When It Reigns (Mixed Media); Akil Roper – Flashing Lights (Acrylic on Canvas).The details(All Destiny events are Free Admission & Open to the Public)Destiny: Local To Global PerspectivesFriday / February 76 – 10 p.m.Art Talk6 – 8 p.m.Monday / February 17Moderator: Atim Annette OtonArtists: Anna Kasperowitz, Lawrence Ciarallo, Donchelle Fulwood, and Janhavi Firke.Closing Reception6 – 9 p.m.Friday/February 28For more information visit: www.JCTCenter.orgJersey City Theater CenterMerseles Studios339 Newark AvenueJersey City, NJ 07302(201) 795-5386 ×’In The Distance’ by David James In its first group art show of a new decade, Jersey City Theater Center (JCTC) asks a question so universal it cuts to the core of the human condition – what is destiny?JCTC selects topics that are global in scope yet relevant to the community and the theme of destiny attracted a diverse array of artists who explored the subject with a variety of styles, mediums and viewpoints.center_img ‘In The Distance’ by David Jameslast_img read more

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Three indicted on trafficking charges

first_imgChrissie Laforge (Photos by Franklin County Detention Center)FARMINGTON – Two women and one man were indicted on two counts of aggravated trafficking each by the Franklin County grand jury Thursday, relating to arrests made last summer in Avon.Brandice Dotolo, 38 of Avon; Oscarlin Peguero-Ortiz, 22, of Avon; and Chrissie Laforge, 40 of Winsted, Conn., were each indicted on two counts of aggravated trafficking, Class A felonies that relate to cocaine and heroin that was allegedly found when a River Road residence in Avon was searched by law enforcement agencies on July 17. Police reportedly discovered 95 grams of suspected heroin, 67 grams of suspected crack cocaine and $5,000 in suspected drug proceeds. In addition to the felony charges, criminal forfeiture proceedings have been filed against all three individuals.According to an affidavit previously filed by the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office, law enforcement agencies executed a search warrant on July 17 and located the drugs. At that time, Laforge reportedly admitted to investigators that she had brought heroin and crack cocaine into the residence from out of state, including, in a trip that took place shortly before law enforcement arrived, approximately four, 10-gram bags of heroin along with two-and-a-half packs of crack cocaine, each approximately 10 to 15 grams of cocaine per pack. Per the affidavit, drugs located in the house had been intended for resale by Peguero-Ortiz and Dotolo.Oscarlin Peguero-OrtizPeguero-Ortiz reportedly told FCSO Det. Stephen Charles that he stayed at the Avon residence and watched Dotolo as well as maintained and sold the drugs brought to the house by Laforge. The affidavit indicated that Dotolo told police that she resided at the home and allowed Peguero-Ortiz to stay there in exchange for receiving heroin as a result of the arrangement. She also reportedly admitted to assisting in arranging sales of drugs to people in the area, describing it as “she takes the calls and Oscarlin [Peguero-Ortiz] makes the sales,” according to the affidavit.Laforge, Peguero-Ortiz and Dotolo were all arrested and transported to Franklin County Detention Center.An indictment means that after considering the evidence the district attorney has presented, the grand jury believes there is probable cause, or a “reasonable belief” that the crime occurred. Class A felonies carry up to 30-year prison sentence in Maine.Brandice Dotololast_img read more

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Commencement: It’s a spectator sport

first_img 16Parents cluster like a media horde, cameras in hand, as they photograph their kids before the Class of 2009 official photo on the steps of Widener Library. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 8Yuliana Sedlacek peeks through the gathered graduates in Memorial Church during the 2008 Baccalaureate Service. Author J.K. Rowling delivered the commencement address for the class of 2008. Photo by Matt Craig 3Marie Gerard (from left) and Joan Arruda watch graduates process past a window in Leverett House in 2012. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 12The view from atop the steps of Widener Library is pictured during the 2010 Commencement ceremony. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 4Ethel Holt Toles (from left), Protocol to Her Excellency Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, Milen King, and Ambassador William Bull, Liberian Ambassador to the United States, listen to Her Excellency Ellen Johnson Sirleaf, (not pictured) The President of the Republic of Liberia, as she speaks during the 2011 afternoon exercises at Harvard University Commencement. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 19Family members watch and photograph graduates process into the theatre for the Morning Exercises in 2010. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 10Jason Aaron Katz (from left), Rebecca Hart, and Ricky Hart watch the Morning Exercises in 2010. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 17John Xi (left), from Chicago, father of Joy Xi ’09, joins other parents in photographing their kids during the Class of 2009 official class photo, while son Matt, age 10, can’t stifle a yawn during the proceedings. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 18Family members crowd the steps of Widener Library during Commencement 2009 inside the Tercentenary Theatre. United States Secretary of Energy Steven Chu delivers the Commencement address in the afternoon exercises. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 9Family members including Maite Garcia de Albeniz (center) crowd onto the steps of Widener Library during the 2012 Commencement ceremony in Tercentenary Theatre. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 5Family members gathered on the steps of Widener Library to listen to the program in 2010. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 20Harvard University President Drew Faust (from center) and Ravi Parikh look out the window watching the graduates line up to process into Memorial Church for the 2009 Baccalaureate Service. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 7In 2009, Leonvil Altidor (from left) and Andree-Rose Saint-Cyr, custodians in Thayer Hall, watch the Baccalaureate Procession through Harvard Yard. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer The sea of caps and gowns, many decorated with colorful regalia, is a memorable sight in Harvard’s Tercentenary Theatre on Commencement Day. But glance beyond the graduates and you’ll find an even larger gathering. Spectators, holding cameras, video recorders, bunches of flowers, and programs, fill every corner of the yard, stretching to the highest perches on the Widener Library steps. Parents, siblings, spouses, and friends — they form a grinning, proud pride. Staff members, working hard to make the University flow, pause and watch their favorite students on the cusp of their next chapter. Behind the success of each graduate stand the spectators. They come from next door, they come from around the globe, but they stand together and celebrate Commencement Day. 6Parents and family members stand along Massachusetts Avenue waiting for a glimpse of their graduates as they process into Tercentenary Theatre in 2010. Actress Meryl Streep was one of the honorary degree recipients during the morning exercises. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 15Marylynn Antonellis (center) tries desperately to attract the attention of her daughter Annie ’09 outside Memorial Church, as husband Joe attempts a photo from behind his wife’s outstretched hand. Jon Chase/Harvard Staff Photographer 1The Morning Exercises take place in Tercentenary Theatre. Family members watch graduates process in front of the steps of Widener Library during the Commencement ceremony of 2010. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 14Laura Togut ’08 (from left), Rory Sullivan ’09, and Virginia Anderson ’08 are cheerful despite the rain during the 2008 Senior Class Day exercises. Kris Snibbe/Harvard Staff Photographer 13Miranda Shugars ’14 (from left), Steph Hadley ’15, Kathryn Reed ’13, Leonie Oostrom ’15, and Christine Mansour ’15, all members of dorm crew, take a break to watch the ceremony from the windows of Sever Hall during the 2012 Commencement. Rose Lincoln/Harvard Staff Photographer 2Harvard University’s Senior Class Day Exercises take place in Tercentenary Theatre. Christiane Amanpour, CNN’s Chief International Correspondent, is the featured speaker. The crowd of gathered seniors and their families listens to the speakers. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographer 11Family members watched as graduates processed through Tercentenary Theatre in 2010. Former Associate Justice of the U.S. Supreme Court David Souter ’61, LL.B. ’66, delivered the Commencement address during the Afternoon Exercises. Stephanie Mitchell/Harvard Staff Photographerlast_img read more

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